Day 7: Pineapple Carpaccio

Onto the first dessert recipe, Pineapple Carpaccio. Although carpaccio is typically a dish consisting of very thinly sliced raw meat or fish, this particular dish does not contain either; instead, it is merely thinly sliced pineapple with a delicious rum dressing.

The dressing contains seeds from a vanilla bean, 100 ml of white rum and 50 g of sugar. Heat the rum and sugar, and flambé. The rum takes to a flame very easily, getting a reasonably large flame quickly. As there was sugar in pan I found that if you let it sit there too long the sugar would start to burn and the flame would get even higher (see video). Once all of the alcohol has been burnt out, add the vanilla bean seeds, the zest and juice of a lime and mix.

Finally, pour the mix over the pineapple and enjoy!

Day 6: Oysters With Rice Vinegar

Oysters, yuck! I’m not a fan of Oysters at all — they taste like runny, salty, snot. Eck! But I have set out to complete ALL recipes in the book, so here goes.

This recipe is an easy one. Raw Sydney Rock Oysters, some sake, some rice vinegar, some wasabi, and a bunch of radishes. Flambé the saké (Perhaps I got some dodgy sake, but it did not take to a flame at all. Or perhaps there was something I was missing), mix together and spoon over the oysters. Bottoms up.

Yuck! The sake mix is relatively nice, but the oysters just don’t go down well at all.

Well, fortunately, they weren’t too expensive, so I’m not too worried if they don’t all get eaten.… Bonzai!

Day 5: Sea Bass With Parsnips

OK, so I understand that the name of the dish is Sea Bass with Parsnips, however… well… I did not use either ingredient. Unable to find Sea Bass at a local seafood market it was decided that instead, the dish would consist of Bream (yum!). As for the parsnips. I just plain don’t like them!

The fish is pan-fried, with olive oil, and the parsnips (or potato in my case) are boiled with sliced onions and then puréed with pouring cream and nutmeg. Additionally, a gremolata (flat-leaf parsley, French shallot, and lemon zest) is sprinkled over the top.

Nothing special with the fish, although it did taste very nice; the puréed potato’s with pouring cream and nutmeg, on the other hand, was a little different (from standard mash potato).

In summary, an excellent, tender bit of fish with some soft, creamy potato. Can’t go wrong with that!

I am not looking forward to tomorrow night. Oysters…

Day 4: Boiled Hen With Vegetables

Moving on to something a little more substantial, Boiled Hen With Vegetables, although still a pretty simple dish. The recipe calls for a Bresse hen and a bunch of different vegetables including turnips, onion and parsnips, all thrown into a pot of boiling water for a couple of hours.

This dish is the first recipe that ingredients have been hard to find, in particular, the Bresse hen. The Bresse is a breed of chicken which originates in Bresse, an area of the Rhôné-Alpes region in France. As such we were unable to find anywhere in Brisbane that sells them. In fact, we could not find anywhere in Brisbane that sells Hens. A few butchers weren’t even too sure what we were asking for. Other butchers said that they could not get any Hens from their suppliers. So we settled on a free range chicken.

The chicken was a bit too large for the pot, filling most of it up, leaving little room for the vegetables. After squeezing in the vegetables and filling the pot up with water, all that was left to do was sit back and let it stew.

After approximately 2 hours it was done; A nice juicy chicken with some soft, well-flavoured vegetables. Plus the remaining water will make for some nice chicken stock…

Day 3: Carrot and Orange Purée

This meal continues with the trend of being a simple and quick; requiring only a few ingredients, a short boil, followed by a quick puréeing.

To be honest, I didn’t think that carrot and orange together would make anything special. I was wrong! Served with some chicken and herbs it made for one very nice dinner.

Much better than last nights oysters…

Day 2: Cabbage-Soy Salad

Another simple meal for day two; Cabbage-Soy Salad. Comprised of — you guessed it — cabbage. Lots and lots of cabbage!

I know that is is only day two; however, I think that this recipe is going to be my least favourite recipe for a while. Maybe it is just me, but I’m just not excited by a bunch of raw cabbage tossed together with oil and soy sauce (amongst other things).

Didn’t end up eating most of it; instead, we had a lovely roast lamb dinner; thanks, mum & dad! Plus I forgot about it and left it in their fridge.

Hopefully, tomorrow’s Carrot and Orange Purée will be more satisfying…

Day 1: Detox Soup

365 Good Reasons To Sit Down To Eat (by Stéphane Reynaud) was one of the great gifts that I was fortunate to receive this year for Christmas. The book contains one dish/meal for every day of the year, and as such, I have decided to go ahead and make every single recipe in the book; starting with Detox Soup.

Detox Soup is a nice and simple one to start with, consisting of onions, leek, celery and some chives.

The only issue with this soup was the overinflated price of leeks at supermarkets; $4 per leek. Usually, we like to head to Brisbane’s Farmers Markets for fresh produce at a reasonable price (however; because of the Christmas / New Years holidays the markets were not open this week) for example you can get a bundle of 3–5 leeks for around $3, depending on the stall.

However, the price of leeks is only a small issue which I am going to face while cooking my way through this book. As the book was written by a French author, for a European audience, there are going to be issues around ingredients being in seasons or available at all. For example, Day 4 the recipe calls for a Brêsse or boiling hen, neither of which are available around Brisbane (after many phone calls to local butchers).

Then there are the recipes who’s name alone is enough to turn you off; such as Calf’s Head…